The Best Android UI’s Around

6. Sony UI

Sony's UI looks dated.
Sony’s UI looks dated.

Sony’s UI for its devices is quite heavy and does slow down the devices. The UI is quite heavy but doesn’t really bring that many options which are actually helpful or can help you make the device reflect your personality(themes)

5. LG UI

LG's UI has a flattened look to it but tries to do  simple things in multiple ways.
LG’s UI has a flattened look to it but tries to do simple things in multiple ways.

LG’s UI has a flattened look to it keeping it in line with Android Lollipop but does come with numerous options to do similar things, eg: There are quite a few ways to multi-task: Slide aside, Dual window and the stock app switcher. Add in LG’s own boring voice assistant. However, it does provide some cool options like Knock on and a resizable keyboard and floating window notifications.

4. Samsung TouchWiz UI

Samsung's Touchwiz has long been hated for slowing devices down but Samsung claims it has addressed these issues with the new version found on the Galaxy S6
Samsung’s Touchwiz has long been hated for slowing devices down but Samsung claims it has addressed these issues with the new version found on the Galaxy S6.

Samsung’s Touchwiz has long been hated for slowing devices down but Samsung claims it has addressed these issues with the new version found on the Galaxy S6. The problems usually stem from Samsung stuffing the devices full of unnecessary features and excessive bloat.

3. HTC Sense UI

HTC's Sense UI is probably the best skinned version of Android around.
HTC’s Sense UI is the best skinned version of Android made by a major OEM.

HTC’s Sense UI is the best Android skin by any OEM making Android devices today. Fast and intuitive, it enhances the look and feel of Stock Android and also provides good customization options including themes and BlinkFeed.

2. Stock Android


Stock bare bones Android is extremely quick as it is and gets the latest updates first. However, it contains all the available Google apps and relies almost entirely on Google Now which can get annoying. Also you need either a Nexus or an Android device to get your hands on the latest builds.

1. CyanogenMod OS

CyanogenMod is basically a turbocharged version of stock Android.
CyanogenMod is basically a turbocharged version of stock Android.

CyanogenMod is a custom ROM that runs on millions of devices around the world. It is basically a turbocharged version of Stock Android with the user being allowed to choose what apps he/she wants to use.

4 of the Most Anticipated Phones to Look Forward to This Summer

Both CES and MWC have passed us and we saw a whole new generation of Smartphone at the two shows. We take a look at 4 of the best smartphones from those shows that we’re hoping will hit the stores next month.

Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge

The Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge both sport QHD 5.1 AMOLED displays. The S6 Edge's display is curved on both sides.
The Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge both sport QHD 5.1 AMOLED displays. The S6 Edge’s display is curved on both sides.
Galaxy_S6_edge_Gold_Platinum_Art_Photo
Both versions of Samsung’s newest flagship feature Samsung’s homegrown Exynos 7420 (14nm architecture) processor which is mated with 3 GB of RAM. There are 3 storage options available – 32, 64 & 128 GB. The devices also support wireless charging.

HTC One M9

The new HTC One M9 combines the design elements of both the M7 and the M8.
The new HTC One M9 combines the design elements of both the M7 and the M8. The display is still 1080p and sticks to the 5 inch size to accommodate the BoomSound Speakers. Under the hood lies the Snapdragon 810 processor and 3 GB of RAM.
The HTC One M9 uses a 20 MP camera which is protected by sapphire glass. The front camera is the UltraPixel unit found on the back of the previous generations of the One.
The HTC One M9 uses a 20 MP camera which is protected by sapphire glass. The front camera is the UltraPixel unit found on the back of the previous generations of the One.

LG GFlex 2

The New LG GFlex 2 is the first device to feature the Snapdragon 810 processor. This new powerhouse is supported by either 2GB RAM and 16 GB ROM or 3 GB RAM and 32 GB ROM.
The New LG GFlex 2 is the first device to feature the Snapdragon 810 processor. This new powerhouse is supported by either 2GB RAM and 16 GB ROM or 3 GB RAM and 32 GB ROM.
The P-OLED flexible display is now 5.5 inches and has a resolution of 1920 X 1080 and is protected by chemically strengthened glass.
The P-OLED flexible display is now 5.5 inches and has a resolution of 1920 X 1080 and is protected by a custom chemically strengthened version of Gorilla Glass 3.

Asus Zenfone 2

The new Zenfone 2 is the first phone to feature 4 GB of RAM. This is combined with an Intel Atom Z3580 running at 2.3 Ghz.
The new Zenfone 2 is the first phone to feature 4 GB of RAM. This is combined with an Intel Atom Z3580 running at 2.3 Ghz.
The Zenfone 2 features a 5.5 inch Full HD display. The power and volume buttons are on the back. The primary camera is a 13 MP unit.
The Zenfone 2 features a 5.5 inch Full HD display. The power and volume buttons are on the back. The primary camera is a 13 MP unit.

@DennisA_James

Content Editor @ProdNote

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The Nexus Story: Is the new Nexus 6 really worth the price it commands?

HTC Nexus One
HTC Nexus One

The Nexus line of devices when they first started out with the Nexus One by HTC was directed at the developer crowd. However, lawsuits and a rather humongous price tag of $529 saw it getting shelved in a rather small period of time.

Samsung Nexus S
Samsung Nexus S

However, less than a year later, Google teamed up with Samsung to bring the Nexus S to life. It featured a larger screen(4.3 inches versus 3.7), and the other specs matched the flagships around the mobile world, it was the first device where we saw Google really concentrating on Android as a UI.

Samsung Galaxy Nexus
Samsung Galaxy Nexus

The next device in the line-up was the Galaxy Nexus, another collaboration with Samsung, saw the arrival of Android 4.0 ICS, which saw Android really change its look to something we see today. Also the screen size increased once again, from 4.3 inches to 4.65 inches.

LG Nexus 4
LG Nexus 4

The arrival of Jellybean saw the arrival of the Nexus 4 from LG. Borrowing heavily on the Optimus G it featured another increase in screen size, a glass sandwich construction and the appropriate specs. It was however built to be an affordable hi-end smartphone. This saw the Nexus line change its spots, bringing the average Joe to the Nexus family thanks to the aggressive pricing of the Nexus 4.

LG Nexus 5
LG Nexus 5

The Nexus 5 continued in the same vein as its predecessor, bringing power-packed specs in a larger frame along with a larger and better display at a price that made its rivals quiver in fear and also brought about the rise of an upstart (the OnePlus One.)

Motorola Nexus 6
Motorola Nexus 6

However, all that changed with the arrival of the super-sized Nexus 6, made with the help of a former Google company, Motorola. Based on Motorola’s 2014 version of the Moto X, the new Nexus bad boy was a far cry from the previous two generations. Instead of leveling with the crowd, it steamrolled past them as it went for the jugular of its rivals from Cupertino, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

Boasting a huge 5.96 inch Quad HD display, a top of the line Snapdragon 805 with 4 Krait 450 CPU’s steaming about at 2.7 GHz aided by the Adreno 420 GPU and 3 gigs of RAM, the behemoth was a brick through the window of Apple’s hallowed grounds. It was Google telling them in the most unsubtle of ways that anything you can do, we can do better.

And those of you cribbing about the price should remember that the cheapest of the iPhone 6 family is still a few grand more expensive than the 64 GB version of Mountain View’s behemoth. Comparing the two is like comparing chalk and cheese. The  more you look at them, the more you wonder, if the fruity thing really is worth that much more.

We’ll leave that for you to figure out.

@DennisA_James

Content Editor

@ProdNote